rus / eng

Politics

Frank Lautenberg was born into the family of Molly and Sam Lautenberg, Jewish immigrants from the Polish territories under the Russian Empire. 
 
The future politician served four years in the Signal Corp. during WWII, saw combat, and returned to study at the Columbia University under the GI Act.
 
He tried himself as a salesman in large companies, working his way to the chair of the CEO of Automatic Data Processing (ADP), after which he managed to get into politics - first in New Jersey, and then at the national level.
 
He became a US senator in 1982, and was re-elected several times, going through many difficult campaigns, including the 17th "dirtiest campaigns in America" according to a prominent political pundit Kerwin Swift, in 1988. 
 
Remembering his roots, in 1989 the senator initiated a new law, which later would be called "The Lautenberg Amendment", a law making it easier for refugees to immigrate to the US. The amendment helped many immigrants from the former USSR.
 
He also became one of the first fighters against terrorism, as a member of the President's Commission on Aviation Security and Terrorism - PCAST, created after the Pan Am Flight 103 tragedy.
 
In 2000 he retired, but returned at the plea of the New Jersey Democratic Party officials, becoming the only senator to return to his seat after retiring!
 
In 2010 he found himself in the center of a scandal, by comparing Dubai to the Devil because of the Emirate's refusal to support American policy towards Iran and Israel, and later was forced to apologize to Arabs.
 
The veteran senator died of pneumonia June 3, 2013, aged 89, survived by four children from two marriages and 13 grandchildren!
 
Sources: 
"Once a Soldier... Always a Soldier" - Legislative Agenda. Association of the United States Army. 2011
Nichols, John (June 3, 2013). "Frank Lautenberg, the Last of the New Deal Liberals". The Nation
Plumer, Brad (June 3, 2013). "How Frank Lautenberg changed public health in America". The Washington Post. 

 


   Bookmark and Share

 

<< back <<